Federal Policy and Legislation

Federal Funding

The annual budgeting and funding process for the federal government begins with the president sending his budget request for the next fiscal year to Congress. Next, Congress crafts its own budget resolution and begins the appropriations process to determine funding levels for federal programs.

To fund the government for FY18, a budget deal was put into place to raise both the defense and nondefense discretionary caps as set in the Budget Control Act of 2011 (for a detailed report on the Budget Control Act of 2011, click here). This work was completed in February 2018, setting a final deadline of March 23 to pass an omnibus spending bill (all 12 appropriations bills combined into one). The omnibus was signed into law on March 23 funding the government through September 30, 2018.

Given the multiple bipartisan priorities found in the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies bill, the education community was pleased to see the majority of the programs at least level funded. Focus and energy now turns to FY19, a process that was initiated by the president releasing his budget request for FY19 on February 12, 2018.

The president’s budget request features six priority areas for education, including providing better choices for more families to attend a high-quality school, supporting high-quality special education services, creating new and alternative pathways to successful careers, promoting innovation and reform around STEM education, implementing school-based opioid abuse prevention strategies, and making the Department more efficient while limiting the federal role in education. This request calls for deep cuts to education and other federal agencies, eliminating a total of 29 education programs, including the Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) grant program and ESSA Title II-A state grants. For an overview of the president’s budget request, review this blog.

In Congress, there has been bipartisan criticism to the proposed cuts, and many members of Congress support programs slated for elimination in the proposal. Many of the proposed cuts and changes to the U.S. Department of Education and its programs were discussed in a hearing March 20 in which Secretary Betsy DeVos testified before the U.S. House of Representatives appropriations subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies.

AACTE continues advocating for programs important to educator preparation to receive a fair share of any increase of appropriations, including the programs listed in the chart below.

AACTE is a member of the Committee for Education Funding, a coalition that advocates for education funding and includes a wide range of early education, PK-12, and higher education associations. The following chart lists the president's budget request amounts, alongside recent appropriations, for some of the programs supported by AACTE.

Program

FY 12

FY 13

FY 14

FY 15

FY 16

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19 POTUS Request

Teacher Quality Partnership Grants (million)

$42.8

40.5

40.59

40.59

43.1

43.1

43.1

0

Title II of ESEA (billion)

$2.46

2.34

2.35

2.35

2.35

2.05

2.1

0

School Leadership (million)

$14.47

27.58

25.76

16.37

16.37

15

0

0

IDEA Personnel Prep (million)

$88.2

83.7

83.7

83.7

83.7

83.7

84

83.7

Institute of Education Sciences (million)

$593.67

562.61

576.93

573.93

618.01

605.27

613

Cut by $79.2 million

Transition to Teaching (million)
This program was eliminated in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

$26

24.6

13.76

13.7

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Last Updated April 2018